What States Require Ignition Interlock Devices?

Feb 15, 2017

It might surprise you to discover that there are no federal mandates for the installation of ignition interlock devices in the case of a DUI. In fact, interlock laws vary on a state-by-state basis. However, currently more than half of the states in the country require ignition interlocks for first-time DUIs. Discover what states require ignition interlock devices by checking out our latest blog post.

What States Require Ignition Interlock Devices? 

The following states have automatic interlock rulings for any driver found guilty of operating a motor vehicle with a .08+ BAC. The interlock sentencing for first- and second-time offenses looks as follows: 

  • Alabama – (July 2014) 
    • First offense 
      • (.08 – .14 BAC) 90 days in lieu of 90-day license suspension. 
      • (.15+ BAC) 1-2 years
    • Second offense 
      • 2 to 4 years 
  • Alaska – (January 2009)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
    • Third offense
      • 18 months
  • Arizona – (September 2007)
    • First offense 
      • 6 – 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Arkansas – (April 2009)
    • First offense 
      • 6 – 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 2 years 
  • Colorado – (January 2009) 
    • First offense 
      • At least 8 months
    • Second offense 
      • 2 years 
  • Connecticut – (December 2012)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 1 year 
  • Delaware – (January 2015)
    • First offense 
      • 4-23 months
    • Second offense 
      • 22 months
  • District of Columbia – (November 2016)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Hawaii – (January 2011)
    • First offense 
      • 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 18 months
  • Idaho – (January 2019)
    • First offense 
      • 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Illinois – (January 2009)
    • First offense 
      • 6 – 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 1 – 5 years 
  • Iowa – (July 2018)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Kansas – (July 2011)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Louisiana – (July 2007)
    • First offense 
      • 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 24 months
  • Maine – (December 2013)
    • First offense 
      • 5 months
    • Second offense 
      • 2 years 
  • Maryland – (October 2016)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Mississippi – (October 2014)
    • First offense 
      • 120 days
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Missouri – (March 2014)
    • First offense 
      • 90 days
    • Second offense 
      • Depends on the circumstances
  • Nebraska – (January 2009)
    • First offense 
      • At least 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • At least 12 months
  • Nevada – (June 2017)
    • First offense 
      • At least 90 days
    • Second offense 
      • At least 12 months
  • New Hampshire – (January 2016)
    • First offense 
      • 1 year
    • Second offense 
      • Depends on the circumstances
  • New Mexico – (June 2005)
    • First offense 
      • 1 year
    • Second offense 
      • 2 years
  • New York – (August 2010)
    • First offense 
      • 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Oklahoma – (November 2011)
    • First offense 
      • .08 – .14 BAC is 6 months 
      • .15 + BAC is 18 months
    • Second offense 
      • 4 years  
  • Oregon – (January 2008)
    • First offense 
      • .6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Rhode Island– (June 2016) 
    • First offense 
      • 1 – 12 months 
    • Second offense 
      • 6 – 24 months
  • Tennessee – (July 2013) 
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • Depends on the details of the case
  • Texas – (September 2015) 
    • First offense 
      • 3 – 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Utah – (July 2009) 
    • First offense 
      • 18 months
    • Second offense 
      • Depends on the details of the case
  • Vermont – (July 2016) 
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 18 months
  • Virginia – (January 2005) 
    • First offense 
      • 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Washington – (January 2009)
    • First offense 
      • 1 year
    • Second offense 
      • 5 years
  • West Virginia – (July 2008)
    • First offense 
      • 4 – 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 2 years

States that do not have Mandatory Ignition Interlock Requirements 

The following states either leave it up to the judge’s discretion for first time DUIs or sets the limit at a higher BAC. These include:

  • California – (January 2019) 
    • First offense 
      • Choose between a 6-month interlock device or 1 year license suspension.
      • .15+ BAC or 2 or more traffic violations can result in a year sentence. 
    • Second offense
      • 12 months 
  • Florida – (October 2008)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months if ordered by a judge
      • .15+ BAC is mandatory 6 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Georgia – (July 2017)
    • First offense 
      • 4 months in lieu of license suspension
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Indiana – (January 2015)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months at the judge’s discretion 
    • Second offense 
      • Depends upon the case
  • Kentucky – (September 2015)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months, if ordered by the court
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Massachusetts – (January 2006)
    • First offense 
      • Not available for first-time offense
    • Second offense 
      • 2 years 
  • Michigan – (October 2010)
    • First offense 
      • .17+ BAC is 1 year
    • Second offense 
      • 1 year 
  • Minnesota – (July 2011)
    • First offense 
      • .08 – .15 BAC 90 days with an interlock device or 30 day license revocation  
      • .17+ BAC is 1 year
    • Second offense 
      • 1 year 
  • Montana – (May 2009)
    • First offense 
      • 6 months, if judge deems it fit
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • New Jersey – (January 2010)
    • First offense 
      • .15+ BAC is 6-12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 1 – 3 years 
  • North Carolina – (December 2007)
    • First offense 
      • .15+ BAC is 12 months
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • North Dakota – No laws on the books requiring interlock devices for first or second-time offenders. Judges may require that if they wish it, but it is a rare occurrence in ND. 
  • Ohio – (January 2005) 
    • First offense 
      • At the judge’s discretion to order an interlock device
    • Second offense 
      • 1 – 4 years 
  • Pennsylvania – (August 2017) 
    • First offense 
      • .10 + BAC is 1 year
    • Second offense 
      • 1 year 
  • South Carolina – (October 2014) 
    • First offense 
      • .15+ BAC is 6 months 
    • Second offense 
      • Two years
  • South Dakota – Repeat and first-time offenders with a .17+ BAC have the option to have an interlock device installed. 
  • Wisconsin – (July 2010)
    • First offense 
      • .15+ BAC is 12 months 
    • Second offense 
      • 12 months
  • Wyoming – (July 2009)
  • First offense 
    • .15+ BAC is 6 months 
  • Second offense 
    • 12 months

Finding an Interlock Provider

For those motorists who have been found guilty of driving under the influence, your specific state may or may not have mandatory interlock requirements. If you are required to have one installed, check out Low Cost Interlock’s locations page to see if we operate near you. We currently run in 25 states and expect to add more in the near future! 

Sources

Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Ignition Interlock Laws in the United States of America – A Look at How States Implement Ignition Interlock laws. (2018). https://www.madd.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/A-look-at-how-States-implement-ignition-interlock-laws-and-how-to-improve-these-lifesaving-laws-4-11-18.pdf

California DMV. Ignition Interlock Devices. https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/brochures/fast_facts/ffdl31#courtordered

NCS. Traffic Resource Center for Judges. Interlock Laws: Western States. (2014). https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/brochures/fast_facts/ffdl31#courtordered

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